National Engineering Day: celebrating our early-careers engineers

As the climate emergency presents new challenges, engineers will continue to provide effective solutions for a sustainable future, early-careers engineers Lottie Harold and Holly Grant tell CIWEM’s engagement manager Chloe Goode.

National Engineering Day is a day to celebrate how engineers are improving lives and shaping the world around us. We have spoken to two of CIWEM's early-careers members about their roles as geoenvironmental engineers, who are working to find solutions to complex challenges in the water and environment sector.

Lottie Harold MCIWEM and Holly Grant GradCIWEM both sit on CIWEM’s Early Careers Network steering group.

Meet Lottie Harold MCIWEM

I #EngineerBetterLives by

Remediating contaminated brownfield sites into useful and sustainable spaces and transforming the way towns and cities can access renewable energy to reach decarbonisation goals.

Tell us what you do

I am a geoenvironmental engineer at Arup and redevelop brownfield sites through designing and supervising ground investigations, developing conceptual site models, and assessing and remediating contaminated land, groundwater, and ground gas. Additionally, I investigate ground energy opportunities to identify site potential for low carbon heating and cooling systems.

What's the most exciting engineering project you have worked on?

Victoria North, a large urban regeneration project in Manchester, involving the supervision of several ground investigations including boreholes drilled into a flowing river channel to investigate contamination migration downstream. I am excited to witness the transformation of this former industrial land into much-needed housing and a new city centre greenspace.

What's it like to be an engineer?

Being a geoenvironmental engineer requires analytical thinking to overcome complex challenges, and no two days are the same, from conducting city-wide geothermal feasibility studies to upgrading local flood defence schemes. As the climate emergency presents new challenges, engineers will continue to provide solutions to work towards a more sustainable future.

Meet Holly Grant GradCIWEM

Working for a company whose engineering is making lives better by…

Striving to provide clean water and wastewater services to seven million people in an environmentally and economically sustainable manner.

Tell us what you do

I work as a geoenvironmental engineer at United Utilities, the water and wastewater provider in the north west of England. My role involves providing risk assessment on ground conditions and organising ground investigations for a range of small-scale to national projects. I also assist with groundwater protection and resource projects.

What's the most exciting engineering project you have worked on?

Last year I supervised the design and drilling of an observation well, and worked with a number of stakeholders to organise a pumping test in a redundant borehole. The project involved several challenges, but it was extremely rewarding to find solutions and deliver information crucial to business operations.

What's it like to be an engineer?

Being an engineer is always interesting, as technology, standards and environmental performance expectations are constantly updating, pushing you to solve complex problems and develop the most effective solutions. Being able to continually challenge myself and have a lasting contribution which affects people’s day-to-day lives makes me proud.

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